The Flood and Water Management Act 2016 by Marshalls

More catalogs by Marshalls | The Flood and Water Management Act 2016 | 6 pages | 2016-11-22

Ads

Contacts for Marshalls

Marshalls

Marshalls Customer Helpline: 0845 820 5000
http://www.marshalls.co.uk/

Featured catalog pages of The Flood and Water Management Act 2016

january 2011 the flood and water management act 2010.  as a major legislatory step towards improving both flood risk management and the way we manage our water resources the flood and water management act 2010 seeks to define clearer roles responsibilities and standards for the creation of sustainable drainage whilst the act places primary responsibility for managing new regulations on local authorities responsibility for the specification design implementation and maintenance of suds schemes remains shared between local government developers land-owners and even home-owners here we take an overview of how the flood and water management act 2010 relates to developers and local authorities

january 2011 an overview for developers encouraging sustainable drainage the flood and water management act 2010 encourages the use of sustainable drainage in new developments and re-developments it does this by requiring drainage systems to be approved against a set of national standards approval is required before building can commence and a connection to the sewer can be allowed it also makes local authorities responsible for adopting and maintaining suds national standards for sustainable drainage national standards for the design construction operation and maintenance of suds are currently under development these standards will set out the criteria on which the forms of drainage appropriate to any particular site or development can be determined the national standards will consider the costs and benefits of sustainable drainage approaches – including cost to developers   to be approved the drainage system must meet new suds national standards covering design

january 2011 approval of drainage plans plans for new drainage systems would need to be approved before construction could start by the suds approving body sab which will be the unitary or county council for the area without the approving body’s consent no construction work can commence on a project the aim is to encourage pre-application discussions between developers planners highways authorities and the sab in order to avoid delays to the approval system suds will become a routine feature of new construction and pre-application discussions will compel stakeholders to consider suds at the earliest stages of site design in order to maximise their use on the development and ensure a smooth approval process suds will become a routine feature of new construction where both planning permission and suds approval are required the processes will run together applications for the drainage system and for planning permission can be submitted together the planning authority will notify

january 2011 adoption of suds the act places a duty on local authorities to adopt and maintain suds this gives developers a further incentive to incorporate sustainable drainage in developments suds assets that serve more than one property will be adopted and maintained by the local authority when it has been completed to their satisfaction and the drainage system is seen to function as approved in the original plans highways authorities will be responsible for maintaining suds in roads to national standards the right to connect to the public sewerage system.  the automatic right to connect surface water drainage to the public sewer network will cease connection of surface water to surface water or combined sewers will be dependent on the drainage system being approved by the sab as meeting the new national standards appeals the act allows for appeals against decisions where proposals for drainage systems have not been approved and also appeals against use of the bond if the suds

january 2011 an overview for local authorities new responsibilities for local authorities the flood and water management act 2010 compels local authorities to take responsibility for leading the co-ordination of flood risk management in their areas and does this by creating a new role of the ‘lead local flood authority’ the act defines the lead local flood authority for an area as the unitary authority or the county council this makes clear who is responsible for managing flood risks but does not prevent partnership arrangements to make full use of all available capabilities and experience the act requires a lead local flood authority to develop maintain apply and monitor a strategy for local flood risk management in its area the lead local flood authority will be responsible for ensuring the strategy is put in place but partners can help them develop it in the way that suits them best local flood risk includes surface run-off groundwater and watercourses including lakes

january 2011 sustainable drainage systems responsibilities the act establishes a suds approving body the sab at county or unitary local authority levels the sab will have responsibility for the approval of proposed drainage systems in new developments and redevelopments approval must be given before any developer can commence construction in order to be approved the proposed drainage system would have to meet new national standards for sustainable drainage these standards are still under development/consultation and anticipated to be in place by 2012 where planning permission is required applications for both drainage approval and planning permission can be lodged jointly but the sab will assess and judge the drainage application separately the sab will also be responsible for adopting and maintaining suds which serve more than one property where they have been approved the highways authorities will be responsible for maintaining suds in public roads to national standards sustainable